Twenty Guiding Principles Of Karate - Funakoshi G. - Book
  • Twenty Guiding Principles Of Karate - Funakoshi G. - Book

Twenty Guiding Principles Of Karate - Funakoshi G. - Book

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Gichin Funakoshi, 'sthe father of karate,'s once said that 'sthe ultimate aim of karate lies not in victory nor defeat, but in the perfection of the charac
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Gichin Funakoshi, 'sthe father of karate,'s once said that 'sthe ultimate aim of karate lies not in victory nor defeat, but in the perfection of the character of its participants.'s To support this life-long stance and offer guidance to future practitioners, he penned his now legendary twenty principles. While the principles have circulated for years, a translation of the accompanying commentary has never found its way into publication until now. Master Funakoshi'ss approach stresses spiritual considerations and mental agility over brute strength and technique. Practitioners should not rely on technique alone -striking, kicking, blocking- but must nurture the spiritual aspects of their practice as well. Attend to yourself and the rest will follow, was the message he set for posterity over sixty years ago. As axioms, Funakoshi'ss principles are open to various interpretations. 'sThere is no first attack in karate's has occasioned endless discussion about its true meaning. Many of these ambiguities are clarified in the commentary, which is also filled with philosophical musings, fascinating historical episodes, and advice for anyone seeking a better Way. Gichin Funakoshi (1868-1957) is one of karate'ss great masters. Born in Okinawa, the birthplace of karate, he began training in the secret martial art as a child. In 1922, at the request of the Japanese government, he demonstrated the still-secret Okinawan art of self-defence on the Japanese mainland, which led to karate'ss introduction to the rest of Japan and subsequently the rest of the world. Funakoshi devoted the remainder of his life to this traditional sport and wrote several classics on the subject, including Karate-do Kyohan and Karate Jutsu, as well as an autobiography entitled Karate-do: My Way of Life. INTRODUCTION - JohnTeramoro PREFACE 1. Do not forget that karate-do begins and ends with rei 2. There is no first strike in karate 3. Karate stands on the side of justice 4. First know yourself, then know others 5. Mentality over technique 6. The mind must be set free 7. Calamity springs from carelessness 8. Karate goes beyond the dojo 9. Karate is a lifelong pursuit 10. Apply the way of karate to all things. Therein lies its beauty 11. Karate is like boiling water: without heat, it returns to its tepid state 12. Do not think of winning. Think, rather, of not losing 13. Make adjustments according to your opponent 14. The outcome of a battle depends on how one handles emptiness and fullness (weakness and strength) 15. Think of the opponent'ss hands and feet as swords 16. When you step beyond your own gate, you face a million enemies 17. Karnae (ready stance) is for beginners later, one stands in shizeniai (natural stance) 18. Perform kata exactly actual combat is another matter 19. Do not forget the employment or withdrawal of power, the extension or contraction of the body, the swift or leisurely application of technique 20. Be constantly mindful, diligent, and resourceful in your pursuit of the Way AFTERWORD - JotaroTakagi
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